Pakistan

Red Dawn

  • By
  • Peter Bergen,
  • New America Foundation
July 23, 2007 |

Two months ago, on a rainy afternoon in Islamabad, I paid a visit to the Red Mosque. Its militant imam, Abdul Rashid Ghazi, was suddenly a force to be reckoned with in Pakistani politics, his students having recently undertaken a series of violent protests aimed at showing their contempt for the government of President Pervez Musharraf. The proximate cause of their anger was the demolition of several mosques in Islamabad that authorities said had been built without the required authorizations, but their agenda had broader elements, including a demand that Musharraf implement sharia law.

Brian Lehrer Show Interviews Rajan Menon on Pakistan

July 20, 2007

The National Intelligence Estimate released this week revealed the continuing role of Pakistan in the survival of Al Qaeda. Former CIA analyst Paul Pillar and Lehigh University professor of international relations Rajan Menon talk about how US foreign policy could best address the problem.

To listen to this interview, please visit The Brian Lehrer Show website.

Pakistan's Uncertain Future

  • By
  • Rajan Menon,
  • New America Foundation
July 20, 2007 |

After the shootout at Islamabad’s Red Mosque, the pro-democracy demonstrations against Pakistan’s President Pervez Musharraf in the months preceding it, and Islamists’ rallies and suicide bombings following it, the United States finds itself in a familiar situation, aligned with a general who grabbed power in a coup but has become politically isolated, perhaps beyond repair. The difference is that Pakistan is now a more dangerous place than it was under the three prior military strongmen, Ayub Khan, Yahya Khan, and Zia ul-Haq.

Inter Press Service Quotes Anatol Lieven on Pakistan, Al-Qaeda

July 19, 2007

The latest National Intelligence Estimate (NIE), a two-page unclassified version of which was released here Tuesday, found that al Qaeda has largely rebounded from its eviction from Afghanistan nearly six years ago and re-constituted both its central organisation and some of its training and operational capacities, leading to a ‘’heightened threat environment’’ for the U.S. itself.

Australian Broadcasting Corp. Interviews Peter Bergen on Pakistan

July 18, 2007

ELEANOR HALL: The latest US intelligence report released in Washington this morning noted that al-Qaeda has found a safe haven in Pakistan to regenerate...

But at the same time, the Bush administration has renewed its support for Pakistan's President, Pervez Musharraf, as Alison Caldwell reports.

ALISON CALDWELL: Pakistan's suspended Chief Justice, Iftikhar Chaudhry, has become a symbol of resistance to President General Pervez Musharraf and his eight-year rule.

The Red Mosque Falls

  • By
  • Anatol Lieven,
  • New America Foundation

WASHINGTON -- The storming of the Red Mosque in Islamabad was a Pakistani action, undertaken for Pakistani reasons. Critical actions of future Pakistani governments, civilian or military, will be taken for the same basic reasons -- and not at the desire of Washington. American presidents can of course bring great pressure to bear on Pakistan, but for obvious reasons, they are unlikely ever to get a Pakistani government to commit suicide on their behalf.

Back to Bhutto?

  • By
  • Anatol Lieven,
  • New America Foundation
June 28, 2007 |

One of the nice things about Pakistan at the moment is that it makes me feel young again. I first went there in 1988 as a stringer for the Times to cover the aftermath of General Zia's assassination and the military-managed "transition to democracy." The inheritors of government were Benazir Bhutto and her Pakistan People’s party (PPP), but the military was careful to balance her electoral victory by keeping an ally of theirs, Mian Nawaz Sharif, as chief minister of the most populous province, Punjab.

Pakistan On the Edge

Monday, July 2, 2007 - 1:15pm

New America senior fellows Peter Bergen and Anatol Lieven recently returned from Pakistan, having met with leading figures from the government, the military, the opposition, the radical Islamist groups, and the administration of the North West Frontier Province and Tribal Areas.

Afghanistan

  • By
  • Peter Bergen,
  • New America Foundation
June 19, 2007 |

In the current issue, I write about Afghanistan’s shaky future as the country tries to overcome years of violence and a devastating dependence on opium trade. The books and testimony below help to illustrate a place whose history is fraught with tragedy -- but where a cautious hope for a better life is beginning to take hold.

Afghan Spring

  • By
  • Peter Bergen,
  • New America Foundation
June 18, 2007 |

This January, somewhere in Logar Province, 40 miles south of Kabul, a 20-year-old goat herder named Imdadullah strapped on a bulky black waistcoat lined with packages of TNT. The packages were wrapped with newspaper printed in Urdu -- the lingua franca of Pakistan -- and tied together with a cord that led to a switch attached to a battery capable of detonating the explosives. Glued to the newspapers were nails and ball bearings.

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