Media

ROOM FOR DEBATE: Does Congress Hear the Occupiers?

  • By
  • Michael Lind,
  • New America Foundation
November 16, 2011 |

On July 28, 1932, at the command of President Herbert Hoover, police and soldiers led by Gen. Douglas MacArthur attacked and destroyed the camp of the Bonus Army, a group of thousands of World War I veterans and their families and allies who had spent the spring and summer protesting the unemployment created by the Great Depression. The violence, in which two veterans were killed and dozens of people were injured, shocked the American public and helped to ensure the victory of Franklin D. Roosevelt over Hoover in that fall’s presidential election.

Stop the Great Firewall of America

  • By
  • Rebecca MacKinnon,
  • New America Foundation
November 15, 2011 |

China operates the world’s most elaborate and opaque system of Internet censorship. But Congress, under pressure to take action against the theft of intellectual property, is considering misguided legislation that would strengthen China’s Great Firewall and even bring major features of it to America.

New America Foundation Fellow Rebecca MacKinnon Named Hearst Professional-in-Residence

November 10, 2011

Rebecca MacKinnon, Bernard L. Schwartz Fellow at the New America Foundation, was named the Hearst Professional-in-Residence for the Spring 2012 semester by the Columbia School of Journalism. In her role as a Schwartz Fellow, MacKinnon conducts research, writing and advocacy on global Internet policy, free expression and the impact of digital technologies on human rights. Her forthcoming book, Consent of the Networked: The Worldwide Struggle for Internet Freedom, will be published in January 2012 by Basic Books. 

New Tools for Today's Investigative Journalist

October 14, 2011
Publication Image

Originally posted on DanBlah.com and cross posted from the Open Technology Initiative.

While I am by no means a seasoned investigative journalist, I have the good fortune to work with some. Looking ten years back I couldn't imagine a media organization considering geek qualifications a core part of an investigative team. In 2011, turning a geek into an investigative journalist is a no-brainer.

New Tools for Today's Investigative Journalist

October 14, 2011
Publication Image

Originally posted on DanBlah.com

While I am by no means a seasoned investigative journalist, I have the good fortune to work with some. Looking ten years back I couldn't imagine a media organization considering geek qualifications a core part of an investigative team. In 2011, turning a geek into an investigative journalist is a no-brainer.

Bugger Off

  • By
  • Evgeny Morozov,
  • New America Foundation
October 4, 2011 |

Back in the day, when bad guys used telephones, the FBI and other law enforcement agencies would listen in with wiretaps. As long as phone companies cooperated—and they had to, by law—it was a relatively straightforward process. The Internet, however, separated providers of communications services—Skype, Facebook, Gmail—from those running the underlying infrastructure. Thus, even if the FBI obtains a suspect's traffic data from their Internet service provider (ISP)—Comcast, Verizon, etc.—it may be difficult to make sense of it, especially if the suspect has been using encrypted services.

Taking Down a Digital Den of Sin

  • By
  • Evgeny Morozov,
  • New America Foundation
October 1, 2011 |

Until very recently books about cybercrime came in two forms. Some authors—the majority of whom had a national-security background—thought it their moral obligation to warn civilization of the impending arrival of an "electronic 9/11," a "Digital Pearl Harbor" or a "cyber-Katrina"—a catastrophe that no stock exchange or central bank would survive unscathed. Others—predominantly computer experts and academics—opted for a more humdrum approach, producing dry tomes full of impenetrable jargon.

Information’s Triumph? Three Ways TechCrunch Challenges Ideas of Journalism

  • By
  • C. W. Anderson,
  • New America Foundation
September 7, 2011 |

In the spirit of doing what one does best and linking to the rest, I’ll dispense with a lengthy overview of the controversy that erupted when AOL CEO Tim Armstrong and Silicon Valley power-broker and TechCrunch founder Mike Arrington announced the launch of what they called “the CrunchFund” — a venture fund that will “invest in start-ups, including some that [Arrington] and his staff write about” on TechCrunch,

Political Repression 2.0

  • By
  • Evgeny Morozov,
  • New America Foundation
September 1, 2011 |

Agents of the East German Stasi could only have dreamed of the sophisticated electronic equipment that powered Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi’s extensive spying apparatus, which the Libyan transitional government uncovered earlier this week. The monitoring of text messages, e-mails and online chats — no communications seemed beyond the reach of the eccentric colonel.

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