Media Policy Initiative

Archives: Media Policy Initiative Policy Papers

The Fact-Checking Universe in Spring 2012

  • By
  • Lucas Graves,
  • Tom Glaisyer,
  • New America Foundation
February 28, 2012

By almost any measure, the 2012 presidential race is shaping up to be the most fact-checked electoral contest in American history. Every new debate and campaign ad yields a blizzard of fact-checking from the new full-time fact-checkers, from traditional news outlets in print and broadcast, and from partisan political organizations of various stripes. And though fact-checking still peaks before elections it is now a year-round enterprise that challenges political claims beyond the campaign trail.

Misinformation and Fact-checking

  • By Brendan Nyhan, Asst. Professor, Dartmouth College; Jason Reifler, Asst. Professor, Georgia State
February 28, 2012

Citizens and journalists are concerned about the prevalence of misinformation in contemporary politics, which may pollute democratic discourse and undermine citizens’ ability to cast informed votes and participate meaningfully in public debate. Academic research in this area paints a pessimistic picture—the most salient misperceptions are widely held, easily spread, and difficult to correct. Corrections can fail due to factors including motivated reasoning, limitations of memory and cognition, and identity factors such as race and ethnicity.

The Rise of Political Fact-checking

  • By Michael Dobbs
February 24, 2012

This report uses the Washington Post as a case study to trace the rise of modern political fact-checking.

Shaping 21st Century Journalism

  • By
  • C. W. Anderson,
  • Tom Glaisyer,
  • Jason Smith,
  • New America Foundation
  • and Marika Rothfeld
October 27, 2011

As the media industry evolves to meet the challenges of the emerging digitally-networked era, so too are journalism schools. Democracy and healthy local communities require this evolution. As the media industry reshapes itself, a tremendous opportunity emerges for America’s journalism programs. Neither news organizations nor journalism programs will disappear, but both must rethink their missions, particularly now that many more people can be journalists (at least, on an occasional basis) and many more people produce media than ever before.

Full Spectrum Community Media

  • By
  • Joshua Breitbart,
  • Tom Glaisyer,
  • Bincy Ninan-Moses,
  • James Losey,
  • New America Foundation
February 9, 2011

This paper, developed by the Open Technology Initiative of the New America Foundation at the request of the Alliance for Community Media (ACM), offers a policy framework that responds to the situation ACM finds itself thrust into and recommends actions to secure the future of community media.

From the Digital Divide to Digital Excellence

  • By
  • Benjamin Lennett,
  • New America Foundation
  • and Laura Forlano, Alison Powell and Gwen Shaffer
February 1, 2011

Communications technologies have continued to evolve and now increasingly provide opportunities for deploying low-cost broadband.

Scranton

  • By
  • Jessica Durkin,
  • Tom Glaisyer,
  • New America Foundation
September 23, 2010

In the past several years the Scranton, Pennsylvania, news media have steadily lost workers. In parallel, the space to publish quality journalism in the leading local paper has been reduced. In Northeast Pennsylvania residents and local governments have been slow to adapt to new online information practices despite high-speed Internet access in the area and readily available online publishing software. In addition, the Great Recession has battered local media, highlighting the limitations of the Scranton news and information ecosystem.

Seattle

  • By
  • Jessica Durkin,
  • Tom Glaisyer,
  • Kara Hadge,
  • New America Foundation
September 23, 2010

Seattle, Wash., could be considered a city singularly suited to develop a healthy democracy in the digital age. The city government, citizens and business have created a productive environment for the next generation of information-sharing and community engagement.

The Research Triangle, North Carolina

  • By
  • Fiona Morgan,
  • Allie Perez,
  • New America Foundation
September 16, 2010

The Triangle is a complex and varied metropolitan area of 1.6 million people, a place in which local identity and regional identity often exist in tension. Connected by highways and by the institutions that employ, educate and entertain, them, Triangle residents tend nevertheless to limit their civic interests to the local communities in which they live. This tension presents challenges to media outlets that cover the Triangle as a metropolitan area.

Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota

  • By
  • Daniel Amzallag,
  • Amalia Deloney,
  • New America Foundation
September 2, 2010

Historically, a robust media ecosystem in Minneapolis-St. Paul has supported residents’ demand for large and diverse quantities of information on both political and quality-of-life issues. Today, the demand for quality journalism in the Twin Cities remains high, but many local media outlets struggle to deliver it sustainably. The digital age has presented significant challenges to a media landscape centered around a print format; however it also presents new opportunities.

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